My Life with London

My Life with London

By: Linda (TRUE Mentors Guardian)

Hi! My name is Linda and I am the proud mommy of three wonderful boys.

My oldest is Mickael who is soon to be 10. My middle son is London who is 4 years of age and my youngest son is Love who will be 2 years old in July. London first started showing signs of autism at the age of two.

At first, I cried for many different reasons. I was constantly thinking/questioning myself and where I went wrong. I cried in fear, never of shame. I cried of the thought that my son may be looked at differently, that my son would not have the same advantages as other children his age, but my biggest fear was the thought of me not being able to keep my London in a bubble and protect him from any judgement and stereotypes from others. I was also in shock with how specialist can evaluate a child for 30 minutes and come up with a life-long diagnosis.

After doing plenty of research and learning how London’s ways, I came to realize how beautiful and unique London really is. Having an autistic child is no walk in the park, but I would not trade this journey for anything in the world! London has given me strength that I never knew I had, he has taught me to be both more patient and kind, and I will forever be thankful for him!

There are many things London may need help with on a daily basis. London sometimes needs to be redirected or instructed on how to do everyday necessities such as brushing his teeth, potty training and crossing the street. London can be noise and light sensitive at times; big crowds scare him as well as the sound of the vacuum cleaner. However, on the brighter side, London has a great sense of memory, notices the smallest and slightest things that they typical eye would not, and his kind heart speaks more words than he verbally can.

In our eyes, autism is his super-power. In honor of Autism Awareness Month, I kindly ask everyone to please remember to please be kind, remember that Autistic children and adults may be different but are never less. Remember that no two people with autism are alike and that not all disabilities are physical. Autism does not have a “look”. Please be accepting of others’ differences.

 

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